Sidekick Clubhouse
My latest painting: “My Secret Romance”. 9” x 12”, vinyl paint on hard board. Part of the “Batman on Robin” group show at Mission: Comics & Art 3520 20th St. Suite B. San Francisco, CA. February 6th through March 3rd. Opening reception this Friday Feb. 8, 7:00pm.

My latest painting: “My Secret Romance”. 9” x 12”, vinyl paint on hard board. Part of the “Batman on Robin” group show at Mission: Comics & Art 3520 20th St. Suite B. San Francisco, CA. February 6th through March 3rd. Opening reception this Friday Feb. 8, 7:00pm.

"Gosh…I don’t know which to choose!" Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #29 (June 1958)

"Gosh…I don’t know which to choose!" Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen #29 (June 1958)

"Thanks again for inviting me to be your overnight guest!" Superman #177 (May 1965)

"Thanks again for inviting me to be your overnight guest!" Superman #177 (May 1965)

Comic Cards Project: Day 30 • Lois Lane
In an era of comics defined by ridiculous, harebrained, what-were-they-thinking stories, Lois Lane wins the prize for off-the-chart silliness. In every issue of her own comic, she made a case for herself as the dopiest of Superman's acquaintances. And that's saying something when his best pal was Jimmy Olsen.
Although billed as “Superman’s girlfriend”, Supes rarely acted as if he was into her at all. This didn’t stop her from constantly trying to trick him into marriage, or carrying on a Betty-and-Veronica-style rivalry with Superman’s boyhood girlfriend Lana Lang. 
When she wasn’t annoying the Man of Steel with her infatuation, she was perpetually trying to uncover his secret identity. You’d think that this would have been a piece of cake for such an acclaimed investigative reporter, especially since she worked at the Daily Planet newspaper side by side with the disguised Superman, but no. And by “disguised” I mean wearing glasses.
Other regular story lines involved Lois stupidly endangering herself, sure that Superman would come to her rescue, and “imaginary” stories where she was married to Superman and raising super children. Many other stories just need to be seen to be believed. For over 15 years in her own title, Lois embodied the absurdity that makes comics of that era so kitschy and fun.
Illustrating one playing card a day using characters found between 1957-1967 in DC Comics. Next up: Martian Manhunter!

Comic Cards Project: Day 30 • Lois Lane

In an era of comics defined by ridiculous, harebrained, what-were-they-thinking stories, Lois Lane wins the prize for off-the-chart silliness. In every issue of her own comic, she made a case for herself as the dopiest of Superman's acquaintances. And that's saying something when his best pal was Jimmy Olsen.

Although billed as “Superman’s girlfriend”, Supes rarely acted as if he was into her at all. This didn’t stop her from constantly trying to trick him into marriage, or carrying on a Betty-and-Veronica-style rivalry with Superman’s boyhood girlfriend Lana Lang. 

When she wasn’t annoying the Man of Steel with her infatuation, she was perpetually trying to uncover his secret identity. You’d think that this would have been a piece of cake for such an acclaimed investigative reporter, especially since she worked at the Daily Planet newspaper side by side with the disguised Superman, but no. And by “disguised” I mean wearing glasses.

Other regular story lines involved Lois stupidly endangering herself, sure that Superman would come to her rescue, and “imaginary” stories where she was married to Superman and raising super children. Many other stories just need to be seen to be believed. For over 15 years in her own title, Lois embodied the absurdity that makes comics of that era so kitschy and fun.

Illustrating one playing card a day using characters found between 1957-1967 in DC Comics. Next up: Martian Manhunter!

Jimmy Olsen as the boy from Mars. Hmmm. I wonder how Superman will feel about this hoax. (Jimmy Olsen #27, March, 1958)

Jimmy Olsen as the boy from Mars. Hmmm. I wonder how Superman will feel about this hoax. (Jimmy Olsen #27, March, 1958)

Comic Cards Project: Day 17 • Jimmy Olsen
Believe it for not Jimmy Olsen starred in his own comic book for 20 years. That’s quite a run for someone who’s only claim to fame was being Superman's pal. If you ask me, though, Superman could have made better friend choices.
Superman could have been buddies with anyone in the world so it always baffled me why he would settle for someone who was perpetually showing huge errors in judgment, always trying to trick him into revealing his secret identity, and often seemed to be on the verge of being mentally challenged.
In a time famous for oddball stories Jimmy’s were some of the oddest. He was the object of many bizarre transformations such as giant turtle-man, human porcupine, and werewolf to name a few. I bet Superman was hoping someday he would transform into a competent adult. 
Illustrating one playing card a day using characters found between 1957-1967 in DC Comics. Tomorrow: Negative Man of the Doom Patrol!

Comic Cards Project: Day 17 • Jimmy Olsen

Believe it for not Jimmy Olsen starred in his own comic book for 20 years. That’s quite a run for someone who’s only claim to fame was being Superman's pal. If you ask me, though, Superman could have made better friend choices.

Superman could have been buddies with anyone in the world so it always baffled me why he would settle for someone who was perpetually showing huge errors in judgment, always trying to trick him into revealing his secret identity, and often seemed to be on the verge of being mentally challenged.

In a time famous for oddball stories Jimmy’s were some of the oddest. He was the object of many bizarre transformations such as giant turtle-man, human porcupine, and werewolf to name a few. I bet Superman was hoping someday he would transform into a competent adult. 

Illustrating one playing card a day using characters found between 1957-1967 in DC Comics. Tomorrow: Negative Man of the Doom Patrol!

News you might have missed!

News you might have missed!